News for December, 2016

Michiko Je Bito-on | December 02, 2016

The 9-day expedition to Siquijor was staffed by a much more diverse team than past expeditions. The team included five foreign volunteers, 10 CCEF staff, three Silliman University marine science graduate students, six volunteers from the Siquijor Provincial Monitoring Team (PROMOTE), as well as 11 military from the Philippine Armed Forces. The foreign volunteers were from the U.S. and Australia; of the six, four were seasoned SPR attendees and two were first-time attendees.

Aileen Maypa | December 22, 2016

To continue our efforts in coral and reef fish recovery in Apo Island Marine Sanctuary, a monitoring was made by a team of Silliman University Institute of Environmental and Marine Sciences (SU-IEMS) – Coastal Conservation and Education Foundation (CCEF) and Department of Environment and Natural Resources - Apo Island Landscape and Protected Seascape (DENR-AIPLS) marine biologists in November 13 - 14, 2016.

Moonyeen Nida Alava | December 16, 2016

Silky sharks Carcharhinus faciformis, Thresher sharks Alopias spp., Devil rays Mobula spp., and the Chambered Nautilus of the Family Nautilidae are among the marine species which made it to CITES Appendix II list at the 17th Conference of Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES CoP17).

Camillia Jane Bollozos | December 16, 2016

(Authors: Patice Talaue and C. Bollozos)

One fundamental factor for a successful Marine Protected Area (MPA) is a supportive and active local community. Local community involvement in the establishment of an MPA develops a sense of ownership which motivates them to actively participate. In every community, there are those that stand out and are worth recognizing. Here are our reputable partners in conservation for 2016:

Councilor Solita Panugan of Barangay Cotcot, Liloan

Camillia Jane Bollozos | December 16, 2016

The purpose of establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) is to protect the biodiversity of our marine and coastal habitats and in turn creating a sustainable source of livelihood for our local communities. Livelihood in the coastal communities is not only limited to fishing but a growing industry involving MPAs is tourism. Tourism is an opportunity for the local community to showcase the colorful organisms found in their MPAs and here are a few of these wonderful marine species: